Hohlbuckelringe (Celtic Bronze Anklets) and Eastern Expansion

balkancelts

plan anklet

The most distinctive of personal ornaments, the hohlbuckelringe (bronze anklets) worn by Celtic women are also one of the most significant archaeological markers of Celtic expansion into eastern Europe and Asia-Minor in the 3rd c. BC.

Celtic jewellery ( 3rd century BC ) from female grave 16, Manching Hundsrucken.

Hohlbuckelringe from female grave 16, at Manching Hundsrucken, Germany (3rd c. BC)

Such anklets first appear among the Celtic tribes in the early 3rd c. BC, and include both plain and richly decorated examples. The hohlbuckelringe first emerge in the area of today’s southern Germany and the historically identified territory of the Boii tribe – roughly the area of the present-day Czech Republic (Schaff 1972, Megaw 2004).

plan anklet

Detail of a bronze hohlbucklering from Plaňany (Kolín District), Czech Republic (3rd c. BC)


With the eastwards movement of Celtic tribes the area of distribution of such anklets logically expands greatly and numerous examples from the 3rd c. BC have been recorded in Hungary and Romania

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What Earth Sees of Sky

Paganarch

The second in my series, “Where They May Be Found,” is posted on A Sense of Place.  Last week’s was on Brân; this one’s on Arianrhod:

You can see yourself, shadowy but there, an image I suspect closer to “truth” than the ones we see in polished surface. When I feel unwell, or lost in the world, I stare at myself like this and smile.

But I’m not the only vision in the water, and never the most interesting.

She’s on the surface, and I don’t know how this works. She’s what becomes of the sky in water, silver and blue like the kingfisher. The sky before storms, the sky after storms, so many blues that people just shrug and call it grey.

Stars are balls of flaming gas if animals are mere food and trees are mere fuel, humans mere workers and puddles mere bits of…

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Becoming a druid*

Treasure in Barren Places

“If you were to find a book containing your Druidry – what would it say?”
– question asked by Cat Treadwell

Me: I have to write a post on Druidry.
SJ: And this is different from the rest of your writing how?
– Conversation between me and The Spouse this morning

In a garden at the centre of the world, we were becoming something. It was something we already were, maybe something we had been all along – but still, we became. Some of us had called ourselves by the name already. Some of us, feeling and fearing the heavy burden of the word, chose to shy away from it. Perhaps we felt inadequate when measured against a term with such history and baggage and gravitas behind it. It is a path I have been following for three years, but I didn’t want to use the name. I was afraid…

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Peace love and joy, or else!

Druid Life

I know plenty of people who are all about the peace, love and joy, and express that by doing it, by keeping away from drama, accepting what they get, being nice to people, being tolerant, not picking fights and so forth. That’s all lovely, and consistent and there’s nothing much to argue with.

Then there’s this whole other thing I run into now and then, where people get angry if you aren’t lovely enough. They don’t want negativity and darkness, they want light and positivity, dammit! How dare you come along and suggest that the world isn’t perfectly lovely? How dare you not be exuding joy? Everything is perfect and lovely and good and how dare you piss on my bonfire by inviting me to consider that it might be different. I hate you. Leave me alone. You’re ruining my day.

I can’t help but feel if other people’s shortage…

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Cocoa Yeast Rolls

Crowded Earth Kitchen

picture766

When I was a child, I enjoyed reading Little House on the Prairie books.  I found it peculiar how Laura Ingalls enjoyed bread and butter sandwiches.  “Just bread and butter?” I wondered.  After all, a slice of plastic-wrapped supermarket bread with butter isn’t all that special.  However, thinking about it now, I imagine a slice of Mrs. Ingalls’s homemade bread, no doubt made from freshly milled whole grains and slathered in farm-fresh butter, would be quite spectacular.  While I can’t take us back in time, I can assure you that today’s addition of cocoa powder is enough to make this bread recipe sing with just a dab of butter.  You could just as easily form the dough into a loaf of bread, but I prefer rolls for tucking into lunchboxes.  Go ahead, have a Laura Ingalls day.

Ingredients (makes 14 rolls)

2 teaspoons yeast

1 cup lukewarm (not boiling hot) water

1 tablespoon soft (not melted)…

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Parable Of The Ant – Youthemeus

Today, I watched as a worker ant struggled to get through a tiny hole in the fly screen.
He was carrying part of a leaf, it was bigger than he was.
All around him other ants toiled with their loads, following one another in a seemingly endless line of leaves and ants.
Fixed on their purpose, they journeyed on; no one of them broke ranks except the little ant at the fly screen.

http://youthemeus.wordpress.com/2013/10/09/the-parable-of-the-ant/

Yellow Wood Sorrel

Virginia Wildflowers

Oxalis sp.

Also known as Sourgrass or Lemon clover because of its distinctive sour-lemon taste, yellow wood sorrel is a pretty wildflower or a ubiquitous weed, depending on your perspective and how much of it you’ve got in your yard. There are multiple species in this genus with similar characteristics, so I won’t attempt to nail this one down to species.

A common characteristic of all of the Oxalis species is the three-part, clover-like leaf that is commonly referred to as a “shamrock”.  Each leaflet in the three-part leaf has a charming heart shape (which makes them fun to pick and share with someone you love 🙂 ). Oxalis leaves fold up at night too, which gives them that special “oddity” characteristic that children enjoy discovering.  As the name implies, the 5-petalled, funnel-shaped flowers of Yellow Wood Sorrel are yellow.

There is a pinkish wood sorrel in our area.  Check out Violet Wood Sorrel too.

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