The many names of the Norse god Odin

Mikes passing thoughts Blog

There are many names of Odin. 

In the “Grimnismol” Odin, himself, states:  “A single name have I never had since first among men I fared”.

The use of Odin’s many names is even mentioned in the “Gylfiginning” where it is stated:  “. . . most names have been given him as a result of the fact that with all the branches of languages in the world, each nation finds it necessary to adopt his name to their language for invocation and prayers for themselves, but some events giving rise to these names have taken place in his travels and  have been made the subject of stories, and you cannot claim to be a wise man if you are unable to tell of these important happenings.”

Here it is stated that Odin’s different names originate from two sources:

  1. The many languages of the world.
  2. Stories about events in his life.

Of course, the many…

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Prayer In Schools – Our Pantheons Way

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So, this meme is making the rounds these days. It’s troubling in many ways and I am going to attempt to address them all in this post. First, I am assuming they are talking about the taxpayer funded, public school system here which is staffed by employees who work for the government. Therein lies the problem for me. I am, always have been and always will be an advocate for the separation of the powers of church and state. I believe history has shown again and again that it is disastrous to combine the powers of religion and government and therefore that religion should stick to the religion business and government should stick to the governing business.

Read More: – http://ourpantheons.org/prayer-in-schools-2/

The Wild Hunt: Pagan Community Notes: Raymond Buckland Recovers, Covenant of the Goddess at 40, Sarah Avery Wins and more!

It was announced on Aug. 4 that author Raymond Buckland had suffered a “large heart attack” and was battling pneumonia.The brief announcement explained, “[Buckland] was life-flighted to a main hospital [where] he was in incubation for three days.” He also developed a case of pneumonia.

After a week long stay in the hospital, Buckland was able to return to his home and is reportedly getting stronger every day. His spirits are up and his strength is returning as he fights off the illness. Buckland’s family and close friends expressed their thanks for the healing energy, well wishes and prayers being sent his way.

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Raymond Buckland is the author of over fifty published books and is the founder of the Seax Wicca Tradition. He arrived in the United States in 1962, and published his first book A Pocket Guide to the Supernatural, in 1969. His most well-known work is arguably the big blue Buckland’s Complete Guide to Witchcraft, originally published in 1986. More recently, Buckland has been working on fiction. His most recent novel, Dead for a Spell, is the second in a series called “A Bram Stoker Mystery.”

Buckland is expected to make full recovery, and his family has said that he will be returning personal messages when he is able. They will be posting health updates on his Facebook page.

– See more at: http://wildhunt.org/2015/08/pagan-community-notes-raymond-buckland-recovers-covenant-of-the-goddess-at-40-sarah-avery-wins-and-more.html#sthash.NuHeZNVZ.dpuf

“Pantheism, Archetype, and Deities in Ritual, Part 1” by Shauna Aura Knight

Humanistic Paganism

Note: This series is a follow-up to my essay, “I Don’t Believe in Purification”.  In this 3-part series, I offer some additional context for my approach to deity, spirituality, and ritual.

When I lead a ritual, I’m far less concerned with teaching and enforcing any given theology than I am with getting ritual participants to a place where they can commune with the divine. And, if they aren’t theistic at all, perhaps that’s more just getting people to a place where they can connect to their deep inner wisdom. I identify as a pantheist, so I’m usually going to refer to that “something” that I’m helping people connect to as the divine, as deity, as archetype, as mystery.

I see it as divine communion, but not with something external or “above.” I see it as connecting to the divine within us that always was, we just can’t stay in a constant…

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